Mind the Gap: I’m Gay and Christian

This is the 21st century in the free Western world, yessir.

Yes, I’m wading into this whole debate. Well, not wading, more like already stuck in the middle and trying to be as quiet as possible. GAY-BASHING CHRISTIANS, the papers and protesters say. GOD HATES FAGS, the Christians say. And I’m there, sitting right in the overlap: I’m Christian, and I’m gay.

All this means is that 1) I happen to believe in Jesus: I follow his commandment to love God and my neighbour, upon which all other rules of the faith hinge, and 2) I also happen to be interested exclusively in women. The media doesn’t show us a lot, they like to show the two extreme views in the gay-Christian debate.

In the media: Christians aren’t fans of gays.

All the Christians in the headlines talk about is stoning the gays, how sinful being gay is, and how much God hates the gays. They mention how people like me pick and choose which parts of the Bible to believe, so that we can justify our wicked ways. As usual, they neglect to mention that every Christian does that. After all, I’m not sure I know a Christian who observes the Jewish festival of Yom Kippur, a festival which must be observed according to the book of Leviticus, which is also the book of the Bible admonishing gay sex between men. Neither do I know of any good folk who stoned their child to death for (inevitably) speaking back to them–can’t have your kids disrespecting you now, as the Bible said.

In the media: Gays aren’t fans of Christians.

I have a few friends, formerly of faith, who abandoned it once they came to terms with the fact that they were gay. Because they believed the two were incompatible. And many gay rights activists dismiss the homophobic Christians by making light of their faith, by equating a belief in God to a belief in fairies. For people who preach about equal rights for all, they don’t do a very good job of expressing that belief, and they alienate a potential support base in gay Christians (we do exist!) or Christians who are straight but support equal rights.

Both opinions are stupid.

Well, in my humble opinion. Both sides are so busy shouting at each other, they don’t even try to look for a way forward. They could, should, find a level playing field by getting to understand the mindset of gay Christians. The activists could attempt to understand the convictions of our faith, the Christians could attempt to see why we believe we are God’s gay children. If either side could, for one moment, believe what we believe, maybe we could end this war. Instead we are dismissed as self-hating by gays, and as false Christians by those of faith. It’s a sad state of affairs.

Anyway, next time another such a debate kicks off (next week, probably), I just wonder if someone’ll say: hold up, let’s stop shouting and talk. If we can’t be friends, we don’t have to be enemies. There are people who have reconciliated their sexuality with their faith, and maybe we can do the same.

Or maybe not.

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A follow-up article: The Thank You Post

328 thoughts on “Mind the Gap: I’m Gay and Christian

  1. Kurt

    Not. One of the foundations of religion is good versus evil. Those who believe are good, those that don’t agree with them are evil. But each individual defines good and evil from a unique perspective, and it’s a Herculean task to alter that perspective.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thanks for the comment. Yes, the problem with a lot of Christians, heck, with many people of faith, is that they see the world in black and white. You’re with us, or you’re not. And a lot of gay rights activists see their cause in much the same light. You’re for equal rights, or you’re homophobic. It is a huge task to change one’s perspective, but if I can change even one person’s mind with this blog I’ve achieved something.

      Reply
    2. Ron Goetz

      Kurt, the good vs. evil approach is a necessity only on the political level. Politically, at the popular level, people are motivated by having a clearly enemy — it energizes them.

      Even in the realm of organized religion, there are clearly defined “bad guys.” If you’re a fundamentalist, they’re militant sinners of all stripes. If you’re a religious liberal, it’s the hateful fundamentalists.

      Only on a personal level can we approach the sort of sanity we’d like, the non-judgmental approach. And even then we designate our own “bad guys.”

      We all take turns being jerks, each in our own way.

      Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Exactly. It might be a little idealistic, but human society is all about change and hopefully, we can see a change like this one day soon. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
      1. carolburbank

        I agree with you that we need to listen to each other from a position that is NOT polarized. Hate vs. hate, distrust vs. distrust, righteousness vs. righteousness. Not a good way to go….
        Gay Christians are exactly that non-polarized position. Maybe there are paradoxes within that position, but itΚ»s a great way to start!

        Reply
  2. NotResponsibleAmy

    To me the issue is clear and simple – religion is a human construct, sexuality is not. One, there fore, ought be shifted to accommodate the other, because we can live without it.,

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Respectfully, I disagree. Humans are, by nature, imaginative creatures. We hope and aspire, and this manifests as faith (not necessarily in God, but in something). Religion is the attempt to understand faith, and as faith will never leave our race neither will religion. The way forward is by learning, or at least attempting, to accommodate both.

      Reply
      1. kibbled

        I am not sure why you think that people’s hopes and aspirations lead them to have a faith. Not a view I can concur with. I do agree that tolerance and understanding would help us all but sadly the history of humanity doesn’t give many indicators that this is likely.

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          Not A faith. Simply faith. To hope for something, you have some faith that the thing you hope towards can be gained. When we attempt to understand why we have an emotion as objectively irrational as faith, an ideology is formed. This ideology can be a religion, a law, a religion, etcetera, but it is a direct result of us trying to understand why we have faith in something. For example, in many films the protagonist risks all for a love interest. This is a blind faith, and it is understood and rationalised in the ideology that “love conquers all.”

          Reply
          1. kibbled

            Ok – my apologies not “a faith”. I still disagree that hopes and aspirations necessarily lead to faith. Some may have faith in ideas or people but does everyone have faith?

            Reply
    2. Ron Goetz

      Amy, instead of the word “religion,” let’s use the word “ideology” since it’s more neutral. Ideology is a human construct made necessary by our instinct for language.

      And sexuality? Sexuality is also a human construct. Every “ideology” has a different “understanding” of sexuality. Feminists, fundamentalists, socialists, political strategists–all have a different understanding of “sexuality,” a different use for it as an idea.

      Sex? The “act” of sex is universal, it’s “meanings” are not. The meanings are human constructs, too.

      Reply
  3. gaycarboys

    I understand perfectly. Although things are changing slowly I think christians tend to be conservative and conservatives often have trouble with gay ppl of either sex. It seems to me that they choose which parts of the bible to follow to the letter and which to ignore. There are two points: 1-that the bible contains 6 admonishments to homosexuals but 362 to hetrosexuals, 2-the bible is a very old document and was written in the light of how those people understand the world. We have moved on over the last few thousand years.

    I love your blog!

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      The change is slow, but it can happen. The Christian religion changed after every prophet, changed significantly with Jesus, and changed again with Paul. It will change and as a people we can and will grow in our faith.

      Thank you for the comment, and the compliment! πŸ™‚

      Reply
  4. cashgiftingeaze

    I will never judge anyone for their choice of how they want to live. I still have love for you because we are all human. Love is the key. Once we really start walking in love we can overcame all the hate of indifference

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you for the comment. πŸ™‚ I wish more Christians would take on that attitude: love your fellow human, and leave the judgement to the God you have faith in. Christ preached love above all else, but they seem to forget that. As cliche as it may sound, I think love can conquer all.

      Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you, haha, I wasn’t sure if anyone would want to hear them before this. And thanks for the congrats; it’s a heck of a job keeping up with all the notifications though! πŸ˜€

      Reply
  5. edgeledge

    Your sexuality and beliefs in a higher power are separate parts of the whole. This is one of the biggest problems with any of the organised religions, their belief system is in teachings purported to be from God but really just made up by man to control the masses. Example being the Leviticus quotes you make, this book taken literally would see many people jailed for carrying out crimes with hefty punishments. You should be free to have a faith as well as to be you, if not then I don’t believe those that don’t open their arms to you can call themselves Christian!

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      I agree. Many of the rules and laws in the Bible were made for those times, as a sort of law book for the government to rule the people as there exists today. They have little to do with faith in God at all, which is why I follow the “rules” Jesus laid down: love your God and love your neighbour. To me, that sums up any rules that a true Christian should follow.

      Reply
      1. Paul Leroux

        Leviticus has been widely misunderstood and misconstrued. If you consider its precepts as a unified whole, you can see there is a general idea that subtends them all. Simply put, they require believers in God to be wholly faithful to Him, not divided in their loyalty. Quite literally, Leviticus asks us to avoid being “neither fish nor fowl”. (In biblical terms, that’s what the distinction between clean and unclean animals was all about.) If we give God our hearts without reservation, then it doesn’t really matter whether we are gay or straight.

        Reply
        1. ChiefAaron

          I respectfully disagree, and the reason I do so is what fuels my struggle about this issue. Can we truly follow and love Christ if we willingly choose to live in sin? There is a major distinction between sinning and repenting, and sinning and justifying. God lays it out point blank that homosexuality is sin. I don’t think for one second that God doesn’t love homosexuals or that homosexuals don’t believe in God. But belief (and even faith) do not equal obedience. Obedience is the catalyst here. Can someone really accept God as their “Lord” without obeying Him in full, or at least having a heart that attempts to?

          It’s not something I’ve come to a position of firmness on, but that is what this debate boils down to for me. I don’t envy those who walk this tightrope and struggle with how their sexuality fits in with their belief in a God who makes it clear that he is against that very thing. All I can do is continue to love them and pray that the answers come to them from the Man himself.

          Anyway, just food for thought. Please don’t take this as an attack.

          Reply
            1. ChiefAaron

              I think you’ve sorely misinterpreted that verse. The specific term men and women were not in the original text. Also, no Bible verse can be taken in a vacuum and made to mean whatever we want. It must be examined in context. This verse is not about homosexuality. It’s about similar people with different hearts and the different eternities that they have.

              Besides, why would you want to believe it was about homosexuality if that meant that God was only going to save one out of the two in any given couple? Seems pretty harsh to me. God wants to know and have a relationship with everyone – straight or homosexual – but that doesn’t change His expectation of obedience.

              Reply
              1. Ron Goetz

                Chief Aaron, the context? The two verses follow immediately after a discussion of Lot, Lot’s wife, and the destruction of Sodom. The immediate context is man-on-man sex. Then we have two men in one bed, the very thing forbidden in Leviticus. Then we have two women grinding together. In the greek, words like mill, grain, or wheat do not appear in the Luke passage.

                The reason for judgment is not given in this passage. No reason is given for Noah’s day, no reason is given for Lot’s day, and no explanation is given regarding the difference between the members of the couples.

                The point of this passage: God does not take the sexual activity of gays and lesbians into account in judgment. Their sexual orientation and sexual activity “in that night” are non-issues for God.

  6. Urethra Franklin

    I am gay and I’m an atheist. I don’t however have a problem with Christianity. A great many of my friends are Christians and when it comes to a divine being my motto is “I don’t believe in God but I believe in a lot of people who do.” What I do have a problem with is the assumption that I’m an atheist because I’m gay, as if I would believe in God if it weren’t for a couple of Bible passages or a handful of extremists. My lack of belief is not because I’m pouting over mean things people shout or because the Bible says sleeping with women is a sin (it says a lot of the things a lot of people – gay and straight – do are sins). The seed was planted as a child, long before I understood that I was gay, when I couldn’t get an answer I found acceptable as to why Santa and the Easter Bunny suddenly weren’t real but God and Jesus still were. I respect your beliefs and find it commendable that you’re standing up to say your faith and your sexuality aren’t mutually exclusive. Kudos!

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      I understand perfectly that not all gay atheists hate Christianity, or that not all gay people became atheists because of their sexuality. I’m only commenting on the niche that do because “militant” gay atheists and those who “stray onto the wayward path” are often spoken of in Christian media, and bible-bashing Christians are often spoken of in gay media, an attitude which I was criticising for the post. Thank you for your comment and your respect, and I wish more people would take this stand and stop letting the extremists hog the limelight. πŸ™‚

      Reply
    2. Paul Leroux

      Again, you have to look at the Bible as a whole, not selected, isolated passages. What God continually tells the people of the Bible is this: Be faithful to Me alone and do not wander away after false gods. The value placed on monogamy and fidelity, and the prohibitions against divorce and adultery, are the logical result of this emphasis on faithfulness. Our relationships with others are microcosms of our relationship with God. Faithfulness and loyalty are virtues in both types of relationships.

      Reply
      1. Ron Goetz

        Paul, it’s interesting to me that valuing monogamy and fidelity don’t require religious faith. Even non-religious teen agers are deeply offended by people “cheating.” This is a case of what Paul talks about when he says that when “Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law.” (Romans 2:14)

        We don’t need to proof text every single thing from the Bible, or follow each and every verse. We are created in the Image of God, which means that at the core of our being is God–in person.

        Reply
  7. Dancing Beastie

    It is indeed ‘a sad state of affairs’. Good on you for speaking up for moderation. Communication and compassion is what both ‘sides’ need, not condemnation. Good luck to you.

    Reply
  8. LoveTheSinnerHateTheSin

    I do not like the ‘Hate the gay’ campaign because hating isn’t the solution to anything. I also agree that not all people and Christians (especially because you mention that in your post) are perfect. Everyone sins and man is sinful. However, calling sin to be ‘Okay’ isn’t something I agree with…. If a child disrespectfully speaks to a parent, it is a sin. Although the laws don’t allow stoning of such children or any human for that matter, the sin remains sin. Speaking disrespectfully may not be paid back by killing the child, however, the sinful nature will be called a sinful nature. Likewise, if someone says stone the gay, then that person is simply out of the mind. However, to call homosexual relationships ‘Okay’ isn’t according to the Bible. Christians do sin… and sin has to be called a sin. Just because it is Christian who is sinning, it doesn’t make the sin holy. Sin remains sin. Same with any sin that a Christian may be doing, be it murder or stealing or sexual immorality or adultery. The point is that we all sin. As Christians we cannot continue in sin. Just because the grace of God is freely available, continuing in sin isn’t an option. As Christians we are expected to repent and turn away from sin. So just because other Christians are imperfect, we don’t have the excuse to be imperfect. Salvation is one thing and continuing in sin is another… I think you got them mixed up. As a Christian you are my sister in Christ and I do love you. I do not hate you for sure. However, I cannot call a sin “Okay”. A sin must be confronted as a sin. So thumbs down to people who propagate “Hate gay” campaign in the name of Christianity however, thumbs up to people who call sin a sin and love the person despite the sin.

    Reply
    1. nigeil

      You sir have hit on a great point. We all have different, ‘innate’ vices. Some are ‘born gay’, others are ‘born alcoholics’, some are born ‘womanizers’. Just because one has a propensity to take a certain stance or commit a certain act does NOT mean that such acts are acceptable to God. No one has a right to hate a gay person, the same as no one has a right to hate an alcoholic; we must love on all people. However, how many people, when they look upon an alcoholic in his natural state, think that his lifestyle is something that God (or man, for that matter) respects? Few, I would think.
      The difference between the alcoholic and the gay is not sin, nor the severity of sin (for all sin is equal in the eyes of God). Rather, the difference is our society’s view of such activities. We live in a culture that fears offending those who claim to be a ‘minority’; this is a direct result of a phenomenon called ‘multiculturalism’, which stretches not only to different cultures and religions, but also lifestyles. Because we, as a whole, fear offending those who are a minority in our world, we tend to give them more breathing room as it were.
      This is not to say that we cannot love one another regardless. Those who vehemently protest against gays are just as wrong as those who protest for gays. And in the end, God will judge all, so we must only do what we can.

      Reply
      1. Ron Goetz

        Nigeil, we live in a country that protects minorities against the capricious will of the majority.

        If you want to follow Jesus’ example, then you need to speak your piece and let people take it or leave it. Jesus let people either come to him for more, or walk away.

        And you want to impose your religious beliefs on non-Christians? Here’s I Corinthians 5:12 in several different translations:
        βˆ™ “What business is it of mine to judge those outside the church?” (NIV).
        βˆ™ “For what have I to do with judging outsiders?” (NASB).
        βˆ™ “It is not for me to judge those outside the church” (NLV).

        Heed Paul’s warning, my friend.

        Reply
        1. nigeil

          I have no intent of judging others, nor do I attempt to impose my beliefs upon others. However, I have as much a right to state what I believe as you and this blogger have a right to state theirs. Society has a tendency to hate those opinions which are either ‘traditional’, ‘old-fashioned’, or favored by the majority. I can live with that, but I refuse to stop taking this stance simply because it’s not favored by many.

          Reply
          1. Ron Goetz

            Nigeil, when anti-homosexual Christians launch campaigns to forbid same-sex marriage, or forbid gays and lesbians from adopting, or forbid gays and lesbians from teaching in public schools, then those people are indeed imposing their beliefs on others. This may or may not apply to you, I don’t know.

            I would never urge anyone to change their beliefs because of fear of being unpopular. I would only want someone to change their beliefs because they realized their beliefs were faulty, and needed refining or change.

            But I will work to keep from doing damage to innocent people.

            Reply
  9. yoursalwaysleah

    I really like your point. The media really does miss the fact that there are gay Christians. I will just tell you now, I don’t understand why you and others think you are God’s gay children – maybe you could explain that more to me or in another post.
    I am a Christian and I believe the New Testament Laws are those that we should follow since Jesus brought a new covenant. And with that everything in Leviticus goes out the window, kind of (there is a catch, lol), but I am curious as to how you interpret Romans 1 in the New Testament that Paul wrote. I believe the direct passage is Romans 1:26-27. Just let me know, I’m not looking to get into an argument like most people, just looking for some answers since I am not gay and not in your shoes, so to speak. Thanks. πŸ™‚

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Oh, I don’t mean anything special by God’s gay children. I only meant that we are God’s children like anyone else, and like or not we are gay, and that does not invalidate us from receiving his love like some conservative Christians believe it does.
      It’s rare that anyone says that! Many believe in the NT but pick out some of the OT laws to throw about. In regards to what I believe Paul wrote, it’s better explained here: http://www.soulforce.org/resources/what-the-bible-says-and-doesnt-say-about-homosexuality/#comment-451 , under the heading
      ROMANS 1:26-27: NATURAL AND UNNATURAL. (Sorry to make you scroll, if you haven’t the time just tell me in a reply and I’ll gladly explain over email!)

      Reply
      1. Pamela

        so wouldnt natural sex mean between a male and female since they have the anatomy needed for coitus and for the production of offspring? gay people physically cannot produce children.

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          The argument of no children=unnatural is rather dangerous. By that logic, infertility, pre-pubescence, menopause, and intersexuality are all unnatural, too.

          Reply
      2. yoursalwaysleah

        Ok, thanks for the clarification.

        I do think that sometimes people forget about what Jesus coming did for us. lol. We got a new covenant and don’t have to follow all the laws in the Old Testament anymore. So when I hear the argument of homosexuality bring up all the Old Testament laws we don’t follow I just think to myself, “Really” Obviously people who are uneducated about the history of the Bible and what it actually says are blowing things way out of proportion.

        If you check out my blog I have a page called, unChristian. There’s a section there about homosexuality and the church/’Christians’. I am actually going to become an ordained pastor, so all of this is interesting to me. I still don’t necessarily agree with the natural and unnatural thing, that’s something I am going to have to think about further. But I do agree that you can be a Christian and gay. Thanks for your post! It’s really got a lot of people thinking. πŸ™‚

        Reply
  10. toeachherownblog

    Very well said. I blogged about this issue a few weeks ago. I just don’t understand why people on both sides are so concerned with hating the other side; if everyone just worried about being the best person they could be instead of who is different than them, everything would be much smoother.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you very much! Yes, there’s too much hate, confusion and misunderstanding on both sides. I understand it isn’t easy to change one’s views, but if they could even just try, I believe it would be easier for everyone.

      Reply
  11. beckony

    I think the biggest problem is that “Christians” is way too inclusive. There are so many denominations and the media never bothers with that. Catholicism and United Universalism might as well be two separate religions.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      There are so many denominations, and people create new ones all the time. The Christian faith itself is very wide and diverse, and every denomination believes their own thing, follows their own personal God you could say. That makes it even harder for us to make communal decisions, but it’s happened before, and I believe it can happen again. Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  12. rubiescorner

    I just came across this blog. I am a Christian, but I hate to see times when we speak down at someone, or say things that hurt other Christians, or people who don’t believe. We have a responsibility as Christians to love our neighbors as ourselves. But we have problems getting along with everyone. If we really are Christians, then the love we have should go to everybody, not a certain group. We have walls around us and inside each wall are the groups.
    This past year a gay person came to Christ in our church. He sat down with my husband, and they talked for several hours. This person had cried all during the service. My husband led him to Christ. He was gay, and all messed up many ways, but he came to Christ, and that has be clear since he has come to our church.
    He had come two times when I came up to him and hugged him during church when the congregation was doing this. We decided to walk some, so we met that next week for our first walk. I have been his friend for some time, and our church has started a drug addiction class on Friday nights. I cook for the group. This person has gone off all prescriptions that he was on, and he has prayed with us many times at the church. He is a leader in our church, but chooses not to be an officer. He is humble, funny and bold about his stand in Christ. We all love him. We have seen him change, and we would not know what church would be like now without him.
    If we had ignored him, he would have gone away. I think his coming to our church was for a reason. He thought it was so he could straighten his life out. I think it was for us all. It was God’s choice, and the Saturday before he came to Christ, I prayed over the seat he sat in on Sunday. This man wept all during the whole service. I am so glad he decided to come to church that Sunday. Ed could have met with him on Monday, but he came, and he hasn’t stopped coming since. He is loved by everyone.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      That’s a beautiful story. And I’m so glad that you and your church reached out to that man, because there are some churches who would reject him, or have him change himself before letting him in. That is not based in a faith in God, that is faith in our complicated, flawed and very human religious system. Jesus preached love. If more Christians could remember that, and focus on that, then we would be able to break down those walls. Thank you so much for commenting. πŸ˜€

      Reply
  13. Rek

    I’m gay and conservative, and I grew up religious so I field similar dichotomies. Nowadays, many of best friends, gay and straight, are devout in some faith or other (mostly Catholic or Protestant). I’m glad you see and remind others that people are so much richer than the social and political conflicts of the day. The more we learn to appreciate everything a person has to offer–including and especially the parts of them that confound us–the better we’ll be able to live well among one another.

    Reply
  14. retiredday

    Your basic position is similar to the situation with messianic Jews. Many Christians refuse to acknowledge that messianic Jews are indeed Christians. And many Jews outright reject messianic Jews as authentic Jews because they believe in Jesus. They are caught in a sort of spiritual no-man’s-land. This conundrum is easily solved by a deep and intimate familiarity with what the Bible (not religious organizations) actually teaches.

    In my 67 years, I have found that most people (even so-called “faithful”, “church-going” “believers”) don’t really spend very much time finding out for themselves what the Bible actually says. Most people want someone else to tell them what it says. So they look for someone that makes them feel comfortable — someone they can “trust” — and repeat whatever that person says, as their “authority”.

    I have known many “gays”, some of them Christians. So, it does not surprise me that you identify with both. However, the Bible is clear that homosexuality is a sin. And just like every other sin, we will all be held accountable for them. Just because you have particular desires or attractions does not automatically justify satisfying them.

    A Christian who sang with me in a church quartet confessed to homosexual desires, but did not yield to temptation until he moved away to attend college, and made friends with members of the Metropolitan Church. When I asked him in a letter how he could be consciously transgressing God’s Word, he wrote me back several arguments propounded by the pastor of this church. In every case, these arguments took huge leaps away from sound exegesis by changing word definitions, presuming facts that are not in the text and placing a heavy reliance on emotional feelings.

    I recognized that this pastor, his church and my friend were all spiritually deceived. They didn’t see the truth because the lie was too shiny and wonderful. They believe what they want to believe. It isn’t a matter of intelligence or education. It’s all about either being receptive to the Spirit of God or being led by the gratification of our own sense of self. If you want something bad enough, you will see whatever you want to see and bend everything around you to fall in line with your fantasy.

    We are all accountable to God’s standards. And all of us can find those standards in the Bible. If you ask the Holy Spirit to reveal the truth to you, he will. But you have to ask and keep on asking, seek and keep on seeking, knock and and keep on knocking. It isn’t easy for any of us. God bless you. You will be in my prayers.

    Reply
    1. Ron Goetz

      Michael, I am glad that you exercise what you have called your God-given right to think for yourself. And I am glad you extend that right to others, no matter how they may disagree with you.

      God’s grace is unfathomable. I think we’ll be surprised by a lot of the people we meet in heaven. I’m glad that our unity is not based on doctrinal agreement (which is impossible), but on the Holy Spirit: “Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” (Ephesians 4:3)

      Reply
  15. Paul Leroux

    First of all, congratulations on having your article fresh pressed by WordPress. That’s how I stumbled upon it. Second, I admire your courage in voicing a different view on the subject, and your idealism in believing that faith and sexuality can be reconciled. I have spent 40 years of my life (off and on) trying to do precisely that, and have found it as well-nigh impossible as squaring the circle. As things now stand, I find I have a tenuous relationship at best with both the gay community and the Church. I think the answer lies in a one-on-one relationship with God, and a return to faith in its purest and most pristine form: the Scriptures themselves. I wish you good luck on your spiritual journey — better luck than I ever had.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thanks for the congrats: not yet sure if all these notifs are a gift or a curse, though. πŸ˜‰ Thank you, and yes, the entirety of this post is idealism from just another kid. Maybe one day I’ll turn it into a reality, and maybe I won’t. I admire your efforts, even if they haven’t pulled through for you. I agree about a personal relationship with God, that was what Jesus advocated I believe. The problem is that the advent of a church means that there’s a crowd of Christians who believe in a collective sense of faith which must be shared, and a difference to that collective faith sparks trouble. That trouble causes too many problems for me to lie down quietly, and even if I can never change a soul’s mind I will live my life trying. Thank you for the kind wishes, and I wish you the best on your journey too–it might be rough now, but it’s not over yet.

      Reply
      1. Paul Leroux

        Hi again … Just wanted you to know that your blog entry prompted me to write one of my own (in French). Translated into English, its title means “Homosexuality and Christianity: Another Point of View”. I talk about seeing Leviticus and Romans, not in isolation, but as part of the broader framework of the Bible as God’s message of love and desire for relationship with humanity. Thanks for inspiring me!

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          I’m happy to hear I inspired that! πŸ˜€ Google translate is always touch and go but I will definitely read that post. God bless, hope you keep on at what you’re doing and don’t ever give up!

          Reply
  16. Pamela

    So ur born again, filled with the Holy Spirit and you didnt feel convicted about having homosexual feelings? The bible is clear about homosexuality. When you read the scriptures from the first chapter of Romans (the New Testament), you dont feel convicted? Because as a heterosexual female, I felt convicted when I read about fornication. Sin is Sin. Finally, I love you and God does too. Dont forget that.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      I’m not born again, no, like a lot of the world’s Christians I was raised in the faith. I won’t get into a whole argument about the Bible and homosexuality, because I believe to descend into petty blows (as such discussions do) is beneath the both of us. And as a fellow Christian, and more importantly human, I love you too. And I know God loves me, He always has. Thank you for the comment.

      Reply
      1. Pamela

        πŸ™‚ you’re welcome…
        just keep in mind that to be a real Christian is to confess your sins and to ask Jesus to be Lord of your life. Once you do that you will become Born Again and filled with the Holy Spirit. being brought up in Christianity doesnt make someone a Christian no more than a person being raised going to mosques all their lives, a Muslim. its when they say the statement acknowledging Muhammed as the true prophet and their is no god but Allah. it is called the Shahada (if im not mistaken) but anyways I think you get the point. And please dont get mad, I will be praying for you.

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          There is no real Christian, seeing as no-one can be “like Christ.” We can only aspire to be. But I assure you, Jesus Christ has been the Lord of my life for a very long time. We talk often, though not in a way many could understand or comprehend. πŸ˜‰ I am not mad at all, you are being kind and respectful and I know that you only say these things out of a Christian love. πŸ˜€

          Reply
  17. Michael

    I am not in any way trying to be dis-respectful or challenge you in any way, I am a Christian who is full of the Holy Spirit that battles between the flesh and the Spirit daily. I am not gay and do believe that gay people can be saved like any other person who acknowledges the LORD JESUS CHRIST as their Saviour. But as I said before I have my battles! Things that are sinful that were once easy to do have become harder and harder to practice. I get convicted of everything!! I know what the Bible says about being gay and Im just curious to know if you have an inward battle going on inside of you? Im sure you know the scriptures I put below. I believe being gay is a sin just like premaritial sex is a sin. Thats my personal opinion. I believe that if a gay person truly comes to Christ, it will get hard to remain gay. Remember, Im not Westboro Baptist and I do not hate gay people either.

    1 Corinthians 6:9
    Do you not know that the unrighteous will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived. Neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor homosexuals, nor sodomites,
    Romans 1:26-27
    26 For this reason God gave them up to vile passions. For even their women exchanged the natural use for what is against nature. 27 Likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust for one another, men with men committing what is shameful, and receiving in themselves the penalty of their error which was due.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      The only inward battle I face is the same as any other Christian or in fact, person: morality vs selfishness. The “gay struggle” you’re insinuating is something I got over long ago; I learnt to accept that though some might hate me, God does not, and I don’t need to either.

      In regards to the Corinthians quote: the word homosexual is NOT in the Bible. At all. Before the 1950s, in place of the word homosexual in that quote, was the word arsenokoitai. It is a Greek word for which a translation was never found, and some translator put in the word homosexual once and the rest is history. In regards to the other quote, please see the link I gave yoursalwaysleah above.

      Reply
      1. Michael

        I will take a look. I havent got into the Greek at all. What about Romans though?
        Im totally against bashing anybody period, YAH knows all of my faults!! Im still workong on that log in my eye too!!!lol The 2nd commandment is love for each other. I believe love will win everytime. I cant compare another person to myself before GOD when HE can see every little dirty detail in me. Thats what is so good about the BLOOD!!! The Lord Jesus paid for it all!! He’s not looking!!

        Reply
      2. GodisLove

        To be a Christian is to be a imitator of Christ. He gave his word to be a guidebook for his people (us). In order to live like a Christian you must find out what God expects out of his people. In other words you must read the bible to know how to live like a Christian. It is our guidebook to how to live for God. The bible tells us how to live a righteous and holy life. Why does it tell us to live a holy life? 1 Peter 1:16, Be ye holy; for I am holy. Because…God is holy and he requires the same from his people. I am sorry people but inorder to live for God…to be a Christian you must change your life. These are not my words…these are the words of the bible. There are tons of scriptures that talks about living a holy and righteous life. God loves homosexuals… and believe it or not …he loves murders….rapists…drug dealers…he loves everyone. Why? Because he is love and can save anyone …..but…..he requires something for us and that is for us to live for him….to be an imitator of Christ. Christ came not just to die on the cross for us but to show us the way…to be an example. Yes it is hard to change. Yes it is hard to stop doing what you have been doing but the bible tells us that we can do all things through Christ which strengthens us….Philippians 4:13. What does that mean? It means if you allow God to strengthen you, you can do all things including living a righteous life for God. Yes we are all sinners but to be a Christian is to walk like Christ. Yes this a process but when we truly commit our lives to God it is possible. God is the only judge and yes there are some Christians that bash gays when they themselves have no right. They do it out of ignorance because God is love but he also is a righteous God and he requires righteousness for his people. Many people take the bible in pieces but by doing this you void the whole meaning of the bible. You miss the whole meaning of the book. It is God’s words for how we should live. So to the writer of this blog…. God loves you and wants you to live a righteous life like the way he tells us in the bible.

        Reply
      3. GodisLove

        When the bible speaks about uncleanness…sexual immorality…perversion…its talking about anything that is sexually ungodly according to the scriptures and that includes lusting…fornication (outside outside of marriage)….homosexuality…..in the bible days homosexuality was referred to as unnatural affection.

        Reply
  18. Kate

    Congratulations! I feel a bit special to be one of the first blogs you’ve visited since starting your own! I am distrustful of anything that gives a group a platform for ‘righteousness’ so my criticism of christianity is probably not welcome here. But the gay debate in general is something I am VERY vocal about, whenever I have the opportunity to be so, and well done you for writing such a great piece on the matter.

    The attitude of many (not all) Christians towards GLTB individuals is one of the many reasons I find it easy to put my faith in other things, humanity and the capacity for change for instance, rather than religion. I can only imagine that being the middle is a formidable place to be. All the best!

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you! Haha, your blog is an excellent one, why wouldn’t I visit? πŸ˜‰ I am equally distrustful of such platforms, actually. I dislike organised religions, but I find comfort in the teachings of one specific religious prophet, mostly because he encourages being good just for the sake of being good, not being some righteous, holy person. But I won’t bore you with that.

      Odd thing is, I’m not usually this vocal. But I dislike it when both sides attack each other instead of moving forward and yep, being in the middle of all that sucks. I’m glad your faith works well for you, and thanks for the wishes!

      Reply
  19. cameroncloud

    God Love You!!! I want you to know that of course you’re not being too “idealistic”. The problem with most religions, especially christianity is that they spout hate and bigotry while claiming that God supported it. In one sentence, they’ll claim that God loves, protects, and forgives you. Then they’ll turn around say that God will send his wrath to you and might show mercy if you get on your knees and pray untill your blue in the face! Or even more outrageously; give the church enough money so that the priest or clergymen will pray for you! Hello… Which one is it!? You cannot say that God loves you, and the next minute be damned to hell for a supposed “sin”. Anger and hate is strictly a HUMAN charcteristic… Not a Divine one. There is No room in the Perfect being for such pettiness. God is ALL LOVING period. For those of us who have children or animals, think of this. No matter what our children do, whether they throw a baseball in the house after they’ve been asked not too and end up breaking a vase. Or you found that they’ve taken drugs even after years of having them swear to never participate in there use. Does that mean that you just click “cancel” when it comes to your love for them… Let’s all scream in unison: NEVER!!! If that’s the fact of Love between a parent and their child or precious animals, then think of the Infinite ability to Love that Mother and Father God have for all of THEIR children, which is all of Us!!! The point I’m trying to drive home here is that by just thinking logically, we can see the downright falsehoods and inconsistencies that some of these hypocritical and so called christians put forth as true. You know that Jesus never spoke out against anyone other than, of course the Sanhedrin and Pharisees because of their hypocrisy. Thank You dlaiden for your post, and Bless You in your pursuit of the True Loving Christ. God Love You – I do!

    Cameron

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      The whole confusion is everyone having their own personal relationship with God, and then trying to force it down someone else’s throat. >.< Saying that God hates anyone makes no sense, because He doesn't, He can't. God is love, and the Christian faith should be love, but all our other human emotions get in the way of that. Thank you for your comment, and God bless you too, Cameron. πŸ™‚

      Reply
  20. sheerazgulsher

    Great post and power to you man, religion is between yourself and God, if people want to hate then they obviously aren’t good Christians themselves.

    I’m from the Muslim faith and it’s a similar situation to you, most of the gay haters are hardly good Muslims themselves: they don’t pray, they drink/do drugs, they commit adultery but suddenly when it comes to homosexuality – it’s wrong in Islam.

    I’m not gay myself, nor am I particularly religious but I feel for you and your struggle. People can be hypocritical and moronic but there are good ones out there too. God loves all. Much respect,

    Sheeraz.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you for the comment! Christianity, Islam and Judaism, I think they’ve all got the same mixed range of emotions concerning homosexuality. I’m glad you spoke up for Islam regarding this, because I believe all religions should realise exactly what you and I know: God loves us all. My best friend is Muslim, and that’s exactly what she told me when I told her I was gay. I wish more people were as open-minded as you and her. God bless.

      Reply
  21. Scott Fillmer

    Interesting post. I always find the point of view most unique from a Christian who says they are gay than a gay who argues with Christians and doesn’t know what they are talking about, or a Christian who argues with gays and has little understanding of their own faith. I have my own views and opinions but am almost tired of arguing the theological issues in the debate of homosexuality around Scripture.

    I know I am a Christian, and I know I am a sinner, but save by grace. Any Christian who claims otherwise is reading some other gospel.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you. Yes, I can’t stand watching either of those types of people debate the issue, because there is so much they misunderstand or just don’t want to. Arguing with them will lead one round in circles. And you are absolutely right, all of us are sinners, one way or another. If I am a sinner for being gay, I am no greater sinner than a person who is straight, and we will both be saved by grace through faith, not the depth of our sin.

      Reply
  22. nigeil

    I have a question on what you say at the beginning of your post. You said you were ‘exclusively interested in females’. Does this mean that, though you have gay tendencies, you continue to seek out female companionship instead of male? If you do sir, I compliment you greatly, and so does the Catholic Church (though I can’t speak for other Christian groups). This is what the Catholic Church has asked gays to try to do, rather than act on their impulses. I don’t know if that matters to you, but I know that the Church has a much more concrete stance (though not violent) on such issues as these; perhaps you should look into them sometime!
    God bless.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Oh, perhaps I should clarify: I’m a girl. I do in fact seek out male companionship, but for purely platonic relationships (I often tend to relate to males better). I used the word gay because, I don’t know, I’ve always preferred it to lesbian.
      I understand the views of the Catholic Church, but I could not live my life denying myself the right to fall in love with a woman. It would destroy me, it would never fulfill me, the same way it would never fulfill you if you had to live with a man and never love a woman (assuming you are male). But thank you for being respectful, and thank you for your comment.

      Reply
  23. anjakimberley

    This is an interesting post, and a reassuring one. Very young, I gave up the church as I was fed up of the prejudice viewpoints and felt a degree of exclusion – probably when it was assumed that my peer group were too young to be sexually aware let alone gay.
    For a long time I had no regrets about this and to some degree my stubborness around the issue was compounded when a born again Christian at work took it upon herself to argue that no-one can be gay and call themselves Christian.
    The truth of the matter is that had I been more stubborn that that and done exactly what I wanted from an early age I would have at least had the knowledge to challange her. This post provides some of that all important knowledge, Jesus would surely never have approved of such a large hole being left in a persons life over such matters.

    Reply
  24. http://wearehispeople.wordpress.com

    According to Scripture there is no such thing as a practicing gay Christian – see Romans 1:18-32. We’ve all sinned and have fallen short of the glory of God. So, we all must repent of our sins, turn away from them, and turn to God. God determines what is sin, not our personal feelings or desires.

    He’s the final judge, and He provided His Word – the Bible – for us to know Him and His will. There is no salvation, no Christianity, outside of God’s word. We cannot pick and chose verses we like and don’t like. We either believe the entire Bible or we reject it all. If we reject God’s word, we reject Him, and as a result, will die in our sins.

    We all have weaknesses that we must overcome. We cannot be a wiling slave to sin and expect to see the Glory of God.

    Reply
    1. cherylhuffer

      21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened.– by this verse, it is the ones who do not give glory to God and only look to sex for salvation that our persectuted. Gays are not looking for sex for salvation. They love as deeply as heterosexuals do. Christian gays love God as much as heterosexuals do. I think the real lesson from the Bible is Luke 6:37 “Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven.

      Reply
    2. Michael

      What you said sums it all up pretty darn good! You know the LORD!! I suffer with the inward struggle against sin like every Christian does. Thats the Holy Spirit waging war against our flesh. Im not gay and have not one single thing against gay people. It is the duty of every single born again believer in YESHUA to love one another..I believe every word of the Bible. I have to be reading the Bible to know what YAHWEH is saying through HIS word. I used to try to justify certain sins and those sins became harder to do as time went by, again, the Holy Spirit convicting me.

      Reply
  25. Secondhandsurfer

    I’m a Christian and I don’t hate gays or bash gays. I agree with you~where’s the love in that. Thank you for pointing out the laws in Leviticus-excellent argument. It makes a lot of sense.

    Reply
  26. cherylhuffer

    I am not gay, and up until a few years ago I did not know gay people. Nonetheless, my gay friends are no different than my straight friends– they are my friends. I have to think God sees all his children in the same light! I get so upset by the supposed religion of love (By the way, I’m Catholic) spouting off more hate than love. Isn’t it the Bible that says “do not judge, lest you be judged?” I wrote a blog after the whole Chick-Fil-A thing to try to share me feelings. You have definitely made me feel even more strongly that God and Jesus are about loving each other, not hating each other! I think God loves you for you! Peace!!!!!

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      Thank you! I think a lot of Christians fear that because we differ from them in one aspect, we differ in a lot of aspects–we only want sex, we want to corrupt children, we don’t believe in God, etc. None of that is true, and I wish more Christians could be like you and realise that. Christianity is the religion of love and I aim to show people that. πŸ™‚ Thanks so much for your comment, and I’ll definitely have to get round to checking out your blog!

      Reply
      1. cherylhuffer

        It is Day 209 that you should read on my blog. It makes my heart sad that so much of religion is about right and wrong– it’s like politics— and that is not the message of Jesus!

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          I’ll definitely read it–just need to catch some shut-eye after all these comments. πŸ˜‰ I know what you mean: religion should not be about right or wrong, good or bad, it should be about love. But unfortunately religion was created by humans, and like its creators it is very, very flawed.

          Reply
  27. hanna

    God loves homosexuals. God loves everyone. God loves me! ( a lier, selfish, thinks impurly, greedy). Because God loves everyone, the church should too. Once when they weren’t worthy, God loved them too. But in my relationship with Christ he calls me above these things that hinder me from growing in my faith and God being able to communicate effectively with me. (Be holy as I am holy 1 peter 1:16). He gives us his Holy Spirit to overcome. Though God loves us, and accepts us as we are (TRUE!) he wants us now to surrender fully and follow him. For me that means through his strength not to lie, to act unselfishly, to be generous… I guess the argument here is whether or not homosexuality is a sin/something to be worked on. Jesus doesn’t say anything specific in his ministry but he hones in on a way of life that is pleasing to God. So why this fuss, if we claim he’s still alive he must be able to let us know his thoughts on the subject. Many things i know to be true in this faith have come through revelations through prayer/God telling me (not just jesus’ words all that time ago). So, ‘ask and you will recieve’. If you wanted, ask God what he thinks, ask God to tell you if its right or wrong in his perfect opinion. Im sure he’d love to.
    Much love, good luck. Go hard for God!

    Reply
  28. londontransmotum

    sex ends with the climax, then youre back to square one. sex doesnt advance us. its a physiological thing, it’s not spiritual. sex doesnt bring us closer to God. It just keeps us where we are. It’s a trick, it promises something it never delivers. Making love was a term coined in the 60’s by predatory hippies who wanted to bang naive chicks. Sex is just sex it’s lust not love, if you love someone, buy them something.

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      I’m not talking about sex at all. And when I’m attracted to a women, I am not attracted to her for the pure intention or desire of sex (I’m sixteen, for goodness sakes’, I’m not thinking about that). Though I think if I fell in love, I’d express it better than through a material gift.

      Reply
      1. londontransmotum

        You say you’re not talking about sex but I thought being gay was a sexual preference. When gay people tell me being gay has nothing to do with sex I get confused, maybe you can explain. For the record I have no problem (or indeed interest) in other peoples sexual preferences.

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          Being gay/lesbian, in my book, means being both romantically and sexually attracted to the same gender. Gay activists focus on the former, right-wing Christians on the latter in debates. Homosexual is specifically sexual attraction, homophilia would be romantic, but it’s easier to use an all encompassing term.

          Reply
      2. brightbluesaturday

        You’re sixteen?
        For a sixteen year old, this is an incredible post, not only well written but also comprensive and I’m incredibly impressed that you know your mind at such an age. I didn’t come out until I was 18.
        Moreover, I’m impressed by your ability to debate with these somewhat aggressive comments. My FPd post got some pretty hurtful comments, and some of these upset me a lot, and it was on grammar!

        Reply
        1. dlaiden Post author

          Heh, yes, I’m pretty young. I’ve been writing for a long time; the written word is where I’m most comfortable expressing myself. πŸ˜‰ I’m not out though, not to the family: part of the reason this blog is anonymous. :/
          Thank you. I try to be courteous, because I know how heated topics like this can be. In regards to your blog, was it the ever-constant presence of the so-called internet grammar Nazis? They can be terrible sometimes. >.< Used to be one, now two years sober. πŸ˜‰

          Reply
          1. brightbluesaturday

            My blog was about grammar, and how I can’t quell my inner-Grammar Nazi. But apparently this made me unpleasantly tedious, and also led people to trawl through my whole blog to find any misplaced apostrophe. I think if people knew a post were going to be Freshly Pressed, they would revise it, and maybe a few others – but maybe it’s the unexpected aspect, and being caught off guard that makes it nice.
            Good luck with getting through the rest of them.

            Reply
        2. Paul Leroux

          I didn’t want to be the one to say it, because I was afraid it might sound condescending, but yes, coming from a 16-year-old, this post is remarkably well written and cogently argued. When you consider the sloppy way people write these days, with total disregard for grammar and punctuation, I’m mightily impressed (and very very thankful)!

          Reply
  29. Eva Schiffer

    If you haven’t read it already, I’m sure you would enjoy “The year pf living biblically” by A. J. Jacobs. A man follows ALL the rules in the bible to the letter… and man does he turn into a freak… Just to support your point that every Christian picks and chooses…

    Reply
    1. dlaiden Post author

      That sounds like a very interesting read, and impossible challenge. I’ll definitely add it to my list. πŸ˜‰ Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
  30. Tori Nelson

    Reading this post and especially your responses to comments makes me incredibly happy for you for having such a calm and kind head on your shoulders and sad that a huge portion of the public find it harder to love a person than hate him/her. A few months ago I had quite the interesting conversation with a friend and fellow Christian over dinner. She’d found out that a family friend is gay and began explaining her religious objections to him as a human being. “So you object to him as a person… just in general?,” I asked her. She responded that she was commanded to denounce him and be clear with him that this was an act of her relationship with Jesus Christ. I pointed out that over this same dinner we were also discussing plans for my upcoming wedding…to a man… who’s been divorced before…and with whom I share a two-year-old son. She knows this about me, of course, because we are friends. As my friend, she loves and acknowledges me as a faithful Christian. I had to point out the hypocrisy to her. If she can so fiercely hate a man for one sin then she is obligated to hate me, too, right? I’ve read and studied the Bible just as many protesters and commenters have. I’ve read that God objects to homosexuality as he also objects to cursing, being gluttonous, cheating, hurting one another, disrespecting our parents, fornication before or outside of marriage, greed, and deceit. The list goes on and on but what I take away most from his Word is that He loves us, ALL of us, and is most displeased when we fail to love one another in return. In the world today, where technically I should be stoned and publicly shamed but no one says a thing, where you are targetted instead because of who you are, I worry we’ve got a long way to go before people come full circle to the most obvious and right answer: Whatever you’ve done, whoever you are, I love you. Period.

    Reply
  31. The Waiting

    What a beautiful post! Thank you for expressing how being a Christian and being gay aren’t mutually exclusive. It’s words like these that bring understanding and mutual respect.

    Congratulations on being Freshly Pressed! I’ve been lucky enough to have this happen to me as well on posts that were light-hearted and silly, yet I still received hurtful and mean-spirited comments. I can only imagine some of the muck you’re having to wade through in your inbox. As a word of encouragement that you may or may not need, just know that your post is making a difference in the world. God bless! ❀

    Reply
  32. scyn7

    Being pagan, I’m around a lot of people who tend to…kinda…not like christians so much. It’s certainly not the tone I’m getting out of this blog! They can hardly help themselves. Lot of them were raised up in it, and associate it with bad parenting or a restriction on their inner pagan. It’s a killer combo. And then there are issues like this which make it even EASIER to dislike them. Also..if anyone happens to like certain republican tendencies, Christians can really…make that hard. Particularly right now when that kind of conservatism is ALL UP in peoples’ faces. There is more to almost any snap or shallow perception that just about anyone can see. Everyone picks and chooses what they want out of anything. It’s part of the magic of the world. And people are so uncomfortable with what they interpret as “hipocrisy” when it’s just us being individuals. They do it to. You can bet on it. So…you do you! And it’s nice to meet you. πŸ™‚ Personally, I find it extremely admirable when anyone can not only choose their faith and listen to their inside about life choices, but walk that path every day despite what anyone has to say about it.

    Reply
  33. livesinstone

    That was well said. It’s great to read a post from your refreshingly sane and peaceful perspective! It is also so very nice to be able to read something about this topic that fails to one sidedly bash someone on the other side.*Sigh* Posts like this give me hope for humanity. Thanks! I needed that! πŸ™‚ And I love the name of your blog. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  34. Thomas

    Yes, this is exactly right! Being Christian and being gay are not two exclusive things – and I personally have a lot of Christian friends who support my homosexuality, so clearly just because someone is Christian does not mean that they will not accept gays. Great post, I’m glad this one was freshly pressed. (:

    Reply
  35. J Stewart

    Are you starting to think (from all these comments) that you’re not in a “no man’s land” after all? I hope so! You’re not. You’ve done a wonderful service here by discussing your “dual” identities – thank you! A friend who is a straight minister recently wrote me on the subject of gays and God, “If any are forgiven; all are forgiven.” You might find like-minded people (straight & gay) by searching “homosexuality” and “gay marriage” in your WordPress Reader. I’ve noticed the results swing from gay friendly one day to the opposite the next. So don’t be discouraged if you hit it on a “bad” day – try again later! It saddens me to know many gay men and women confuse God with religion and turn away from Godf because their particular brand of religion condemned them. I’m glad you didn’t!

    Reply
  36. brokenanklegirl

    I love your point of view. I think the whole thing is ridiculous and I rarely come across someone who has actually read the bible and has a backing for what they believe in. I haven’t read the entire bible since I was maybe 14. I don’t remember everything, so whenever someone gives me an opinion and they say “It says so in the Bible.”, I ask them to tell me which scripture. They never can. I just can not believe there is no happy median. Anyway, although I’ve always been a very spiritual person, I have only recently began to re-read the whole bible. Thank you for the Leviticus tip. The more I read, the more I will be able to defend my point of view as you have done so well.

    Reply
  37. pob4524

    Wow. I really enjoyed reading this. Much of what was written about homosexuality was referring to idolatry, prostitution, rape & pedastry. These things are also wrong for heterosexuals. There are no references to gay people in loving & committed relationships. Keep up the good work.

    Reply
  38. rami ungar the writer

    my mom’s a rabbi and a lesbian (though as she tells me, she’s only ever loved one woman in her life). she probably feels the same as you do. in my opinion, those verses in Leviticus have been misinterpreted for years. I’m happy that you’re comfortable with who you are and with the God you believe in.

    Reply
  39. ameliael

    Thank you so much for sharing that Blog. I so appreciate your point of view and the importance you hold in the Golden Rule. Have you ever noticed that the Golden Rule is the only commandment that instructs you to actually DO something? It is the only commandment that does not start with “thou shalt not.” Didn’t Jesus say himself that “The letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.” Corinthians 2 3:6. Its funny how people pick and choose what they prefer to listen to. I find this so ironic that my blog “The Other Side” was about the same exact topic…give it a whirl if you’d like! Thank you for this.

    Reply
  40. Mayra Mejia MSc

    I believe in God. I believe in Jesus Christ. I was raised Catholic, however religion has never made any sense to me. Christianity was designed for the purpose of teaching people morals and values as in the 10 commandments. The Bible has no condemnation for loving, committed, gay and lesbian relationships. Jesus never said anything on the subject. Never let any one or any thing change your relationship with God. It is silly to think that God only created one type of human being. The creative power God is infinite and unfathomable to the limited mind of man.

    Reply

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